In the Office

Week In Marketing: #SongForMoms, Ad Injection, #NotBroken, The Pool and Googling

Howard/MerrellMothers

1. Sing A Song about Milk for Mother’s Day #SongsForMoms
Through Sunday, the California Milk Processor Board is creating custom short songs for people who post about why they love their mom using the #SongsForMoms hashtag. The Board is on the hunt for funny and emotional posts about moms to respond to with 45- to 90-second songs. The clips are first uploaded to SoundCloud and then pushed to social media. The goal is to churn out a total of 200 songs through Mother’s Day Sunday, and a few lucky snippets will be played live on California radio stations.

2. Googling for Pizza?
Google’s search results are slowly but surely becoming more than mere pointers to a destination. Google recently added the ability to order food directly from its search results. The feature, which currently works only in the U.S., gives users who search for restaurants an option to instantly place an order for delivery.

3. Honeymaid’s new campaign – Powerful and Polarizing
Honeymaid’s ad campaign portraying interracial, blended and same-sex families illicited a wealth of passionate responses – both positive and negative. When the company created the #NotBroken component of its “This Is Wholesome” campaign, it wasn’t looking to push an agenda, the company was looking for a fresh way for the 90-year-old brand to reach parents.

4. Have you Fallen Prey to Ad Injection?
Google recently released a disturbing report detailing the vast reach of software programs that insert unwanted ads into internet users’ browsing experiences. The practice, called ad injection, is often carried out by malicious browser extensions or misleading software download packages. The software places ads into websites across the web without permission, and its operators sell those ads for a profit, sometimes to leading brands. The Google report found that more than 50,000 browser extensions inject ads, an astonishing number.

5. The Pool invites users to escape from online clutter
The UK digital platform launched last month, The Pool is “For women who are too busy to browse”. The platform is already achieving 60% click-through rates on its daily email, and has named Clinique, Microsoft and Marks & Spencer as its launch partners. The Pool has adapted the broadcast model for online, creating a programming schedule by posting a set number of articles at fixed times in the day so as not to overwhelm its audience with content. Eight articles are published in a 24-hour time period, and each post is labeled with the amount of time it takes to read.

Week In Marketing: Millennial Parents, Bud Light Apology, #GirlYouDon’tNeedMakeUp

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1. Reaching the Millennial Parent
It’s estimated that 40 percent of older millennials are already parents and they account for 80 percent of the 4 million annual U.S. births. This generation of parents born after 1980 is different from its predecessors in many fundamental ways. According to AdWeek, savvy marketers see this as a unique opportunity to capture an enormous segment of the population — if they can help older millennials be practical and solve problems.

2. A Minor Twitter Revolution?
Comedian Amy Schumer did a parody on One Direction’s “What Makes You Beautiful” on her show earlier this week. Afterwards, Schumer encouraged fans to share their make-up free photos with the hashtag #GirlYouDon’tNeedMakeUp — and women are uploading them by the thousands.

3. “Her Shorts” A New Video Series
Refinery29 is partnering with Planned Parenthood on a new digital-video series called “Her Shorts” that focuses on men’s and women’s reproductive and sexual health issues, including videos from Lena Dunham and Emily Ratajkowski. The American-based fashion, style and beauty website announced that two other celebrities taking part in “Her Shorts,” actresses Mae Whitman and Mamie Gummer.

4. Viewers Engage More With TV Ads Than Video Ads
A new biometric survey shows that traditional TV commercials are four times more engaging than video advertising on Facebook. Study participants were exposed to the same video advertisements across Facebook, TV and digital pre-roll on PC, tablet and smartphone.

5. An Apology from Bud Light
Bud Light supported its “Up for Whatever” campaign with a bottle that included the tagline “perfect beer for removing ‘no’ from your vocabulary for the night.” There was public outcry over the seemingly overt date-rape, or at the very least sexual, implications of the tagline. Bud Light parent company Anheuser-Busch pulled the bottle and issued this statement:

The Bud Light Up for Whatever campaign, now in its second year, has inspired millions of consumers to engage with our brand in a positive and light-hearted way. In this spirit, we created more than 140 different scroll messages intended to encourage spontaneous fun. It’s clear that this message missed the mark, and we regret it. We would never condone disrespectful or irresponsible behavior.

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Week In Marketing: Cyber-bullying, Mother’s Day Ad, YouTube’s Birthday, Facebook’s Growth

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1. Twitter Looks to Stop Cyber-Bullying
Last week, Vijaya Gadde, Twitter’s general counsel, wrote an opinion piece in The Washington Post describing the company’s plan to restructure its safety policies and cut response times to abuse reports. The company is launching a program that will detect abuse, using signals and context that correlates with abuse. Cyber-bullying cannot be stopped all together, but Twitter is trying to take a step in the right direction it.

2. Pandora Jewelry Releases Heartwarming Mother’s Day Ad
Pandora Jewelry has released a Mother’s Day ad, in which blindfolded children are asked to identify their mothers by touch alone. The two-minute video already has more than 14 million views on Facebook and 7 million on YouTube. The video celebrates all women, whether they are mothers or not. Pandora tells them to appreciate the women they are at heart.

3. Facebook Unveils Video Program on YouTube’s 10th Birthday
Facebook unveiled Anthology, a new video program that will allows publishers and digital video producers to create videos for advertisers on Thursday, YouTube’s 10th anniversary of the first published video. Among the publishers and producers are Vice, Vox Media, Tastemade and Funny or Die. According to Facebook spokesman, advertisers will be required to run videos created through Anthology as ads on Facebook. This could help Facebook as it attempts to take YouTube’s spot as the top digital-video advertiser.

4. Hydrogen Fuel Video Campaign
There are a number of misconceptions about hydrogen fuel and for many it is even viewed as scary. As Toyota plans to introduce its new hydrogen fuel vehicle in October, the brand will be releasing videos depicting everyday hydrogen sources. Toyota hopes this video campaign will change consumers’ perspective on hydrogen fuel.

5. Facebook Users Grow
Facebook reported that it now has a user base of 1.44 billion per month. Also the number of exclusively-mobile Facebook users has increased to 581 million.

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What Brands Can Learn From Target’s Latest Designer Collaboration

brand partnershipsNearly three months ago, one of the biggest announcements to come out of Target hit the Internet. The popular retailer was partnering with Lilly Pulitzer for their next designer collaboration. That’s right, THE Lilly Pultizer. Queen of American resort wear and floral prints that leave you daydreaming of sunny beach vacays and drinks in coconuts. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest exploded with the news! Devoted Lilly fans get a new wardrobe of springy floral prints to add to their closets while admirers, like myself, who’ve been priced out of the brand, can now live the Lilly life. Life was good. Everyone was happy. Well, almost everyone.

Turns out, some Lilly loyalists were very upset, even insulted that their beloved brand would consider partnering with a mega store. And following millennial fashion, they took to Twitter to voice their frustration. #LillyForTarget

Their comments were even echoed in some of my social groups. Which led me to think. Are designer collaborations a good brand strategy? Do they help or hinder brands in the long run? Is the payoff of penetrating into a new market worth the risk of offending your brand loyalists?

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Week In Marketing: Racist Tweet, #ImNoAngel, Social Media News

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1. Clorox Tries to “Bleach Away” Potentially Racist Tweet
As racially diverse emojis were added to iOS Thursday, Clorox sent out a Tweet showing a bottle of its bleach made up of emojis with the text, “New emojis are alright but where’s the bleach.” Many took to Twitter, enraged by what seemed to be a racist comment by Clorox. Later, Clorox tweeted apologizing for the confusion and stating it wished it could “bleach away” the comment. Clorox explained that the tweet was meant to be about the tubs, toilets and glasses that could use some bleaching.

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Week In Marketing: April Fools, #WipeForWater, Apple Watch, Latest Social Media News

WeekInMarketing1. Twitter Launches Live-Streaming Application: Periscope
Earlier this week, Twitter launched a new live-streaming application called Periscope. Within hours, marketers began utilizing the platform to broadcast exclusive, behind-the-scenes footage and spontaneous question-and-answer sessions with customers and fans. The application’s ability to share replays and its link with Twitter has attracted large brands such as Adidas and Mountain Dew.

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Week In Marketing: Twitter Collaboration, Facebook Conference, #ThanksList, Social Media News

Howard/Merrell News

1. Why Developers Want to be on WhatsApp so Badly
WhatsApp cofounder Brian Acton announced at Facebook’s recent F8 conference that they do not plan to share the WhatsApp API. Acton explained that they want to keep the app as pure as possible, and to make sure no third parties get a hold who might inundate users with messages they don’t want. Many developers are disappointed about this announcement, and Acton reassures them he is “empathetic” to their concerns.

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Week In Marketing: Apple Watch, Latest with Instagram, Facebook & Snapchat, #InternationalWomensDay,

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1. Marketers Now Post More on Instagram than Facebook

A new report shows that brands now post more on Instagram than Facebook. The photo-sharing app has become popular because content is more visible and guaranteed to be seen in users’ feeds, unlike Facebook in which brands have to pay to promote their posts. Instagram now boats more than 300 million users – many of whom belong to the coveted millennial audience that is often hard to reach.

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The Week In Marketing: Twitter Videos, #Dress, Instagram News, and Facebook Ads

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1. Instagram Creates ‘Carousel ads’
Instagram has introduced a new form of advertising that allows readers to swipe left to learn more about the brand or product. These ‘carousel ads’ have been called a digital version of multi-page advertising spreads in magazines. The ads were created as a way to share a sequenced story. “For instance, a fashion company could use the carousel to deconstruct the individual products in a ‘look,'” according to a blog post by Instagram.

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The Week In Marketing: Retweeting Value, Facebook Updates, Effective Press Releases, Snapchat

Get More Retweets

1. Cornell creates ‘Retweet’ tool

Researchers at Cornell University, supported by the National Science Foundation and Google, generated an algorithm that determines what makes a specific tweet more popular than others. It uses word construction, keywords and other elements to predict how popular or ‘retweeted’ a tweet will likely be. The tool gives users the ability to create multiple versions of a tweet to then select the one that will be the most popular. One defect of the tool is that the algorithm equates the length of a tweet with how informative it is.

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